Dr. Kyeong Park

Dr. Kyeong Park |Clyto Access

Texas A&M University, USA

Organizing Committee Member

Expertise: Estuarine and coastal hydrodynamics and water quality conditions, particularly the physical transport processes and their interactions with water quality and living resources

Biography:

Dr. Kyeong Park is currently a Professor and Head of the Department of Marine Sciences at Texas A&M University at Galveston. His overall research interests lie in estuarine and coastal hydrodynamics and water quality conditions, particularly the physical transport processes and their interactions with water quality and living resources. He has been conducting observational and modeling studies of various physical transport processes (estuarine circulation, scalar transport, pollutant dispersion, sediment transport, shelf circulation, etc.) and water quality and living resources-related processes (hypoxia/anoxia, eutrophication, sediment diagenesis, sediment flux, oyster larval transport, etc.).He is the leading author of the water quality submodel of the EFDC/HEM-3D that has been widely used for a number of estuarine and coastal systems.

Presentation:

Title: Bottom Boundary Layer Sediment Dynamics Using High-Resolution Data in a Shallow, Micro-Tidal Estuary

Abstract:

High-resolution profile data of current velocity and suspended sediment concentration (SSC) were collected using a pulse-coherent ADCP in the bottom boundary layer (BBL) of shallow, micro-tidal Mobile Bay (USA). The data collected at two contrasting seasons were used to study the vertical and temporal variability in SSC under various forcing conditions of tide, wind and freshwater discharge. During the winter stormy season, the background SSC was low (15-30 g m-3). An episodic storm-induced erosion/resuspension was responsible for the short-lasting SSC peaks in BBL. During the spring flooding period, the background SSC was relatively high (40-70 g m-3) likely owing to the large fluvial input of suspended sediment and bed softening, and the contribution of wind forcing to sediment resuspension was somewhat enhanced by the destratification in BBL. When freshwater discharge was < 5000 m3 s-1, a critical wind stress for sediment erosion (0.08-0.1 Pa) was observed to abruptly increase the SSC. When freshwater discharge was > 5000 m3 s-1, wind stress was no longer a main controller for SSC, showing a relatively poor correlation between the two. During the low-energy period with low freshwater discharge, the near-bed thermohaline density anomaly was a major factor that determined the stratification in BBL. Under very high freshwater discharges, the entire water column in shallow areas of the Bay was influenced by freshwater input. Then, the thermohaline anomaly’s contribution to the stratification considerably weakened while the SSC’s contribution strengthened. Despite a micro-tidal regime, Mobile Bay exhibited the cyclic erosion and deposition pattern induced by tidal acceleration and deceleration during tropic tides.

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